Facebook’s New Algorithm Change Is Actually Two Updates In One

You already know that Facebook uses algorithms to determine who sees your updates and when – and they adjust those algorithms all the time.

(Which means that occasionally, you need to adjust your strategy, too.)

Facebook’s latest update is actually TWO updates – a couple of changes to totally different parts of the overall algorithm!

Updates like these can impact your visibility in the News Feed not just for individual updates, but for your Page as a whole – and that means you should definitely pay attention to them.

So, double the algorithm changes, double the fun!

Wanna make sure you’re playing by the rules?

Here’s what’s new and different:

Facebook is judging your authenticity

When Facebook is determining who should see your updates and when, it looks at two different types of signals.

Personal signals are specific to the user seeing an update. For example, if there are certain people on Facebook with whom you frequently interact, you’re more likely to see their updates.

Universal signals are specific to user or Page posting an update. For example, if a Page’s updates frequently score high engagement rates, its updates may be shown to more users.

(Think of Facebook like a very trendy personal shopper – it shows you items based on what it knows you like, as well as the overall quality of what’s available.)

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One of Facebook’s most recent algorithm changes relates to universal signals. That means it has to do with your Page and what it posts – specifically, your authenticity.

Facebook has new ways of determining how authentic you and your updates are – and if you aren’t authentic, you could be in trouble.

But what does that mean, exactly?

How do they know whether or not you’re authentic?

It’s not like they can turn you inside out and check your label! (That would be weird and gross.)

On Facebook, authenticity takes different forms.

First, it can mean trying to game the system.

Facebook is usually forthcoming about what you can do to increase your visibility in the News Feed – but that also makes their algorithms vulnerable to exploitation.

Last year, for example, they explained that live video broadcasts would get higher reach than some other types of content.

Sounds like a good way to get people to share live video, right? (Which makes sense, because this is a feature they were promoting pretty heavily at the time.)

The good news is, it worked! What also happened, though, is that people found ways to exploit the system. By posting graphics-only “live videos” like countdown clocks, for example, they could enjoy better exposure in the News Feed without producing an actual live broadcast.

The result? Facebook had to find a way to crack down on people taking advantage of the algorithm – in this case, by limiting visibility for graphics-only live broadcasts.

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Remember what we said about how high engagement rates can increase your visibility?

Some Pages explicitly ask people for likes, comments, and shares as a way of increasing their reach – a tactic that Facebook believes is dishonest and inauthentic.

Another sign of inauthenticity is posting the types of content to which users have certain unfavorable reactions – Facebook gives the example of Pages whose audiences frequently hide their updates.

Another example may be Pages whose updates are frequently reported – especially as Facebook is under scrutiny for issues related to the spread of “fake news.”

Facebook has used the habits of Pages that regularly share inauthentic updates to build a model that can automatically identify and predict whether or not other Pages’ updates are authentic.

The way they see it, Pages that frequently do things such as asking for likes or sharing updates that people hide aren’t exactly great examples of the authenticity users care about. The more you have in common with those Pages’ tactics, the less likely that you’re authentic, either.

So while Facebook isn’t sharing all the different ways that they measure authenticity – after all, they’re trying to prevent people from gaming the system – they’re making it plenty clear that taking shortcuts when it comes to quality isn’t the answer.

That’s one big algorithm update out of the way, but remember – there’s still another new update to talk about!

Here’s the other big change to keep in mind moving forward:

Facebook is tracking real-time changes more closely

Facebook’s algorithms are always working in the background, so that when you visit your News Feed, you’re seeing the information they think is most relevant to you at that moment.

The second update they’ve just made is to how information is processed in real time – specifically, information related to an update’s subject and its engagement.

Basically, Facebook may place a status update higher in the News Feed if:

  • It is related to a topic that is popular on Facebook at that moment (for example, if you share an update about the Academy Awards while the Academy Awards are being broadcast, and people on Facebook are talking about them)
  • It is getting a lot of engagement at that moment (for example, if several of your followers get into a real-time debate in the comments on one of your updates)

Does that mean that all of your updates should be relevant to what’s trending at that exact moment?

Of course not!

What you do isn’t always going to be that timely. (You’re better off not forcing it.)

What it does mean, though, is you should be prepared for the times when it is relevant for you to post timely, live updates.

The best way to do that? Plan your updates ahead as much as possible – even by using a scheduling tool that allows you to share evergreen updates more than once.

An overwhelming majority of marketers prefers planning their Facebook updates in advance over trying to do everything live, and with good reason: it’s too much work!

The more you can plan, write, and schedule in advance, though, the more time you’ll have later when there are appropriate opportunities to post live – and being prepared for those moments is especially important now.

What do YOU think of these updates?

So, Facebook is fine-tuning their ability to measure real-time signals, and they’re paying closer attention than ever to whether or not your updates are authentic.

What do YOU think of these changes, though?

Do they make sense?

Will they influence what you share?

Do they address concerns you might have, or that you’ve had in the past?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Source:  MeetEdgar Blog

The Best Times to Post on Social Media

This article was written by Lindsey Kolowich | HubSpot.com

Below you’ll find the data and research on the best times to post to five popular social networks: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Which time zones do these refer to? For a United States audience, your best bet is to combine Eastern and Central time zones, as they represent almost 80% of the U.S. population. For audiences located outside the U.S., use whichever time zones your target audience uses. Finding your target audience’s location or locations should be a part of your buyer persona research.

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1) Best Times to Post on Facebook

People log in to Facebook on both mobile devices and desktop computers, both at work and at home. How it’s used depends heavily on the audience.

The best time to post on Facebook is 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday.  Other optimal times include 12:00–1:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays and 1:00–4:00 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays. [Tweet this!]

Engagement rates are 18% higher on Thursdays and Fridays, and weekdays from 1:00–4:00 p.m. tend to see the highest click through rates. On Fridays, Facebook use spikes by 10%. Since people tend to be happier on Fridays, Neil Patel suggests posting funny or upbeat content to match your audience’s mood.

The worst times to post on Facebook are weekends before 8:00 a.m. and after 8:00 p.m, according to SurePayroll’s research.

2) Best Times to Post on Twitter

Like Facebook, people use Twitter on both mobile devices and desktop computers, both at work and at home. How it’s used also depends heavily on audience — but people often treat it like an RSS feed, and something to read during down times like commutes, breaks, and so on.

The best times to post on Twitter are weekdays from 12:00–3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. [Tweet this!]

For B2B organizations, the best days to post are Mondays through Fridays, and click-through rate is highest on Wednesdays. For B2C organizations, the best days to post are Wednesdays and the weekends, when click-through rate is highest. According to CoSchedule, B2B content performs 16% better during business hours, whereas B2C content performs 17% better on weekends.

Some businesses have also had success with 2:00–3:00 a.m., 6:00–7:00 a.m., and 9:00–10:00 p.m. post times. Experiment with these times and others to see if they work with your audience.

3) Best Times to Post on LinkedIn

LinkedIn is used by professionals, and they tend to use it during the workweek, during working hours, just before the workday starts, and just after it ends.

The best time to post on LinkedIn is midweek from 5:00–6:00 p.m. Other optimal times include Tuesdays from 10:00–11:00 a.m., and Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 7:30–8:30 a.m., at 12:00 p.m., and from 5:00–6:00 p.m. [Tweet this!]

Tuesdays tend to see the most clicks and shares, especially between 10:00–11:00 a.m. Mondays see lower engagement rates than the rest of the workweek, likely because people are catching up from the weekend. Friday may see lower engagement rates too, as people are wrapping up the week and even leaving early for the weekend.

The worst time to post on LinkedIn is during the night, between 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.

4) Best Times to Post on Pinterest

Pinterest users skew heavily female, and are most active in the evening.

The best time to post on Pinterest is in the evening any day of the week, especially Saturdays from 8:00–11:00 p.m. [Tweet this!]

Other optimal times include every day from 2:00–4:00 a.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m., and Fridays at 3:00 p.m.

5) Best Times to Post on Instagram

Instagram is meant for use on mobile devices, and users tend to use the network all the time, any time — although many users engage with content more during off-work hours than during the workday.

The best times to post on Instagram are Mondays and Thursdays at any time except between 3:00–4:00 p.m. [Tweet this!]

Videos tend to perform best any night of the week between 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m., according to TrackMaven’s research. Some businesses have also seen success with posting at 2:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m., and Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m. Experiment with these to see if they work with your audience.

What Social Media Content Should You Post?

The content you post to each of these social networks depends heavily on your audience. To successfully engage with your audience, you’ll have to really get to know and understand your target audience by creating detailed buyer personas.

That being said, there are best practices for types of posts on each of these networks.

The most effective posts on social media have a clear goal, whether that’s to drive traffic to your blog, encourage comments, get shared, or something else. The general rule of thumb is to keep it real and keep it relevant. On Facebook and Twitter, your posts should be roughly 30% promotional content that link back to your website or blog, and 70% value-added content that includes relevant information your target audience would find useful or interesting.

On Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Pinterest, the best posts use brief but compelling language. They also avoid click-bait phrasing, such as “You’ll never believe what happened next.” On Instagram, your captions can be slightly longer. The official character limit on Instagram is 2,200 characters, but you’ll want to cut it shorter than that to avoid losing readers along the way. Use your Instagram captions to tell a story, connect with your followers, promote an upcoming campaign, or sell a specific product pictured in your post. On all the social networks (especially Twitter and Instagram), use hashtags — but judiciously.

Finally, visual content will perform best on every social network — especially on Instagram and Pinterest, where it’s a critical part of each post. Engage your audience with photos, graphics, animated GIFs, and videos.

There you have it, folks. Happy posting, tweeting, and pinning!

Note: This post was published in January 6, 2016 by HubSpot.com.

The Benefits of Using CRM Software

Article written by:  Grant Lingel

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Advances in technology have made everyday tasks much easier to manage.

For small businesses, new technology and software make administration easier and efficiency more attainable. By making it possible to store all aspects of a business in the cloud, workers are able to organize in a way that was impossible in a world where Post-it notes and whiteboards were the alternatives.

Using customer relationship management (CRM) technology is essential for businesses to engage with their clients. The software can be used to organize sales and marketing efforts, improve customer service tactics and support, implement time management strategies and much more.

The idea of CRM is nothing new. In fact, it has been around as long as people have been making transactions. Ages ago, CRM was simply a sheet of paper used by a businessperson to track sales, manage inventory and keep tabs on customer relations.

Today, CRM technology is a sophisticated twist on that age-old principle. By adding all data to the cloud, companies and employees are able to share, track and analyze all information at any time, from anywhere.

Companies that apply CRM technology to their everyday practice experience numerous benefits, helping them become more productive, efficient and profitable.

Start saving time and money by automating administrative work.
Make time management manageable

Time management keeps workers on track, allowing set goals to be reached in a successful manner.

Not knowing how to manage time is detrimental to completing tasks and staying focused. Multi-tasking, while seen by some as a good way to get a lot done quickly, has been proven to make workers less productive (and dumber). Being able to focus on certain tasks for certain periods of time is a much more efficient way of doing business.

CRMs give workers the ability to sync team calendars, making it possible for entire offices and departments to stay on task. The CRM can send out daily task reports based on priority, which will ensure workers are on top of what’s urgent. Thanks to these task reports, forgetting to follow-up with clients or, even worse, missing important meetings, are things of the past.

Access important information from anywhere at any time

Instant access is arguably the most desirable feature of modern technology. Back in the day, instant access was a luxury, a chance happening. Now, it is a necessity. Most people feel ignored if they don’t hear back from an email immediately or if a message was seen, but the recipient isn’t yet typing their response.

CRM technology makes it possible for all users to add, access and update information from anywhere at any time. This makes a world of difference for those using the system.

When multiple people are reaching out to new leads or contacting clients, instantly updating the database makes it possible to avoid embarrassing situations like reaching out to the same potential client multiple times with the same message. This is especially true with the growing trend of remote workers.

It wasn’t very long ago that people left their work at the office at the end of the day. If something came up after hours, it had to wait; that is no longer the case.

Lead management

Acquiring a vast database of leads is useless if they aren’t followed up on or available to the right people.

Garnering new leads is a multi-faceted process that spans content marketing strategies, emailing and newsletter campaigns, advertising and other marketing efforts. Nothing is more important to growing a business than capitalizing on these new leads.

If a new lead comes in or a partnership develops, that information can be shared immediately with the rest of the team. That way, efforts can be planned perfectly to follow-up on that lead and the right person can instantly get in touch. No more are the days where business has to wait until Monday morning.

Improved customer service and relationships

This is the most important aspect of implementing CRM technology with any business.

Companies that actively manage the relationships they have with customers have a much higher customer lifetime value (CLV). Customer retention and high CLV are key to running a successful, profitable business that grows organically. The happier the customer, the further they will help spread your product or service to the world.

By cataloging customers based on their needs and desires, companies will have a much better idea about how to contact them. This helps companies personalize the experience with each and every customer. This also helps boost CLV and customer retention.

Personalizing the business-customer relationship is of the utmost importance. This makes customers feel as if they are much more than simply buyers of a product or users of a service. They feel a connection, a real relationship with the company. By creating a relationship (and being able to properly organize each and every relationship efficiently), a company can almost guarantee to keep their customers from ever straying to the competition.

Success story

There are endless success stories out there about companies implementing CRM technology, and the number keeps on growing.

With game-changing technology like this readily available and affordable, businesses are seeing the high ROI and spreading the word. With so much to gain, in both growth and efficiency, it is only a matter of time before all companies start using CRM technology.

About the Author: Grant Lingel
Born and raised in Rochester, New York, Grant now lives in Brazil where he owns a hostel and works as the Content Manager of Bunny Inc., creators of VoiceBunny and ArticleBunny. Before Brazil, he was working in the travel industry as a freelance writer, consultant, and promoter for over a decade and has visited dozens of countries across five continents on assignment.